Tag Archives: photography tips

Getting To Know DPI and PPI

There has been a great deal confusion among many people, even among photographers and those working on digital images as to some of the terms used in digital photography. In particular, we are looking at two of the most often used terms, the DPI and the PPI.

What adds to the confusion is that some in the digital imaging field tend to use these terms interchangeably, something brought about for the most part by a lack of understanding what these two terms are about and what they mean.

This post hopes to enlighten you on what these terms are about for you to be better informed about digital imaging and photography.

Pixels Per Inch (PPI)

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If you’re someone like a Hampshire Wedding Photographer who is working with digital images, your primary concern is going to be the image’s Pixels Per Inch or PPI. DPI, which we’ll discuss next, refers to a technical aspect of printing devices which is more of a printer’s concern rather than yours.

So when people say “DPI”, they really mean “PPI” most of the time, and it’s become so much commonplace that annoying as it may be, you just have to put up with it. What’s more important is to know is whether someone talking about DPI really means PPI.

To better understand PPI, we should know first what a pixel is. Pixel stands for “picture element”. It’s the smallest physical element of a digital display device that the eye can discern. You will see these pixels when you zoom in the photo on your screen; these are the rows and rows of tiny little squares.

Note that pixels are physical things of a fixed size, even though that size itself varies. Thus, the number of pixels per inch (PPI) on your screen is a fixed quantity and cannot be adjusted.

What can be adjusted though are the size of the pixels, making the actual images themselves become bigger or smaller by an adjustment of how many pixels can be accommodated per inch.

Remember though that this is only a relative gauge of quality; if you were to stand further away, the image would appear as clear as it did before. The absolute resolution of the image has not changed as there are still as many pixels relative to the picture as there were before. So if you’re looking to have higher resolution, the only way to go about that is to produce an image with more pixels, not increase the PPI.

Dots Per Inch (DPI)

As was mentioned earlier, if you’re a designer, DPI barely concerns you and your work. Still, it’s an important concept to know what it is about.

You see, printers reproduce an image by spitting out tiny dots consisting of a mix of four colors, Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Key (black), which combine to create a range of hues by the subtractive color model. There is bound to be some space between these dots, and this is what DPI measures: their density.

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For example, if you are printing a 150ppi image at 600dpi, each pixel will consist of 16 dots (600 dots/150 pixels = 4 rows of 4 dots per pixel).

This matters to the client more because, as a rule of thumb, the higher the DPI, the better the image’s quality. But on the flipside, it will also use more ink and take longer to print, so keep that in mind for printing such images on your home printer. Just to give an idea, 150dpi is generally considered the minimum standard for high quality photos in books and magazines, 85dpi for newspapers, and 45dpi for billboards.

However, higher dpi does not necessarily mean higher quality because there is no standard dot size or shape, meaning that one manufacturer’s dots might look as good at 1200dpi as another manufacturer’s dots do at 700dpi.

As mentioned a few times here before, you have no control over DPIs. But you can refer a client to a professional print shop and have the shop, which will know the specifications of its machines, take it from there, so to speak.

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What Filters Do You Need For Your Camera?

Filters are a fun and artistic additions to camera, creating some stunning and artistic photos, not to mention helpful in getting around some challenging situations that your camera may not be able to get around by itself. Use filters right, and they can prove to be invaluable tools to the photographer without having to rely much on post-processing editing work.

There are so many filters available in the market that sometimes, it can be overwhelming for one to decide which filters to have. To help in this decision-making process, below are some of the essential filters to have for photographers.

1- Skylight Filter

The Skylight filter baically helps protect the front element of your lens from damage or dirt. It also filters out some ultraviolet light, which helps reduce haze. Do note though that although this filter will prevent the worst of the dust, dirt and water reaching the front of the lens, you may still need to clean the filter to prevent this dirt affecting your images.

2- Polarizing Filter

This particular filter increases color saturation and reducing reflections in non-metallic objects. It usually comes in a rotating mount, as the effect varies as you turn the filter. This means that upon attaching the polarizer and framed your shot, you need to slowly rotate the filter while watching the effect through the viewfinder or in Live View, like reflections in non-metallic objects such as water or glass appear and disappear or adjust the color saturation.

The effect is usually at its most obvious when you’re shooting at right angles to the sun, rather than with the sun behind or in front of you. Like in an outdoor wedding being photographed by edinburgh wedding photographer.

3- Straight Neutral Density Filter

This filter allows you to use longer shutter speeds or wider apertures than what would be available to your camera in the prevailing lighting conditions. It is essentially a ‘darkened’ sheet of glass or resin that reduces the amount of light entering a lens that would reach the sensor, kinda like sunglasses for your camera. It does this without affecting the colours, hence the term “neutral.”

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First, with your camera set to its lowest ISO, you need to frame your shot, and then select the shutter speed and/or aperture to give the creative effect that you want (such as a slow shutter speed in the case of blurring movement).

4- Graduated Neutral Density Filter

This filter serves to balance the exposure between a bright sky and a darker foreground, particularly in landscapes and sunrise/sunset shots. It is like a pair of sunglasses with dark glass at the top and clear glass at the bottom.

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By placing the dark part of the glass over a sky that’s much brighter than the scenery below, and lining the transition up with the horizon, you get a more balanced exposure on the image. These filters come in several different strengths, and with different transitions between the dark and clear areas.

5- Variable or Strong Neutral Density Filter

This filter is somewhat similar to the straight neutral density filter but this one has a variable filter that lets you change the strength or “density” of the filter by rotation of the filter elements. It is usually extremely long shutter speeds or very shallow depth-of-field effects in bright conditions.

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The effects are somewhat the same as using a strong plain neutral density filter, but you can use them in slightly different ways. For instance, with a variable ND filter, you can attach the filter before you frame the shot, focus and set the exposure, as the filter allows you to set it to its lowest strength to start with so you can focus compose your shot beforehand.

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How Do I Choose My First DSLR Camera?

dslr cameraIn the past, most individuals who are into photography for work or just as a hobby use a simple a simple point and shoot camera to capture images of interesting subject. And over the years, with the evolving technology, photography also advanced to a higher level. Now, there are advanced cameras that are being used to capture and produce sharp images.

Why are DSLRs popular?

DSLR cameras are now considered by both amateur and professional photographers as the best type of camera to use. These DSLRs offer remarkable features that can help you produce professional photos that clients and yourself will surely be satisfied of.

For first-time DSLR buyers, it might be confusing to choose a DSLR among the many different brands and kinds available in the market today. DSLRs are generally more expensive than the old point and shoot or even the mirrorless cameras. You need to make sure you purchase the right one so your money won’t get wasted.

There are several factors to consider in choosing your first DSLR camera: budget, image sensor, type of photography, interchangeable lens and future advancement.

  1. Budget

Set how much you are willing to pay for a DSLR camera body. Keep in mind that you still have to buy lenses and other accessories for it. Invest only in what you can afford as a beginner

  1. Image sensor

Full frame DSLR cameras have larger images sensors that means better quality images as well as broader scope of view. On the other, APS cropped DSLRs have are smaller than full frame and at times the capture image don’t appear in full. If you can afford a full frame, then go buy one. It is surely better than APS-C. Wedding photographers Cheshire prefer full frame DSLR cameras than APS-Cs.

  1. Interchangeable lens

Generally, the lenses you can buy for your camera will depend on the brand of your camera body. The camera body and lens must be of the same brand in order to get the desired output image. If you choose Nikon, then you will have to stick with it. If you buy a Canon camera, then you will have to select Canon lenses. If you are into wedding photography, you can get helpful information from kent wedding photographers.

  1. Type of Photography

The type of photography you are into must be taken into consideration when you choose a DSLR. You have to check the specifications of each DSLR you are interested and evaluate if it suits your photography needs. Is it fast enough to capture movement in the football games you often cover or the flowing river you’d like to photograph? Is the camera fast enough? Does the camera work well in low light conditions? You will have to learn every important detail before making a choice.

  1. Future advancement

When after a few years you plan to buy another DSLR camera, the lenses of your old camera can be used for the new one if they are of the same brand. Thus, when contemplating on what DSLR to buy, consider possible advancement and choose the brand that you think is best for you to stick with. Shifting from one brand to another is quite costly so as early as now you will have to select the right one.

Reading online reviews of different camera brands and models can also help you choose a DSLR. You can also get helpful advice from professional photographers by joining online communities and forums. Make sure to do a careful research, canvass prices and compare specifications before doing a purchase so you won’t regret your choice.

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